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Ariane Cap

Ariane Cap

Austrian Ariane Cap is a multi instrumentalist, educator, author, blogger and composer. An eclectic and versatile bassist, she has covered many styles, from Rock (Keith Olsen/Fleetwood Mac), Jazz (Daline Jones, Montclair Women’s Big Band) to Folk and Flamenco (Muriel Anderson), to classical music (The Mozart Band), and Top 40 (Brian Cline Band), Latin Disco (Generation Esmeralda) to Punk Rock (The Sippy Cups) and Cirque du Soleil. As a leader, Ariane has teamed up with star Jazz bassoonist Paul Hanson to create the critically acclaimed duo ‘OoN’.

Her book Music Theory for the Bass Player was published in September 2015 and hit #1 bestseller status in its category within weeks. It is a groundbreaking book that teaches music theory in shapes via fretboard diagrams rather than through teaching standard notation at the same time, which, as the author says, is a vital (but different) skill, that is easier to learn once music theory is mastered.

Ariane started a blog in October 2015 at arisbassblog.com featuring free teaching videos about concepts in her book.

Ariane is also an educator for the powerhouse TrueFire. Her first course is called Pentatonic Playground for Bass and is available as a download or DVD.

Ariane has been featured for her creative playing techniques and solid bandmanship in Bass Player Magazine (January 2014), Bassquarterly (September 2013) and other publications.

She teaches at the Berkeley Jazz School and her own Music School, Step Up Music Vallejo. Ariane has facilitated countless classes, seminars and workshops. She taught and created online classes for the Academy of Art University San Francisco and was on faculty of The Golden Gate Bass Camp. Her own education includes Austrian music schools and conservatories, including the Academy of Music Vienna, as well as American Universities (University of Miami and others). She has studied and assisted in Victor Wooten’s Bass Nature Camps and Steve Bailey’s Bass at the Beach. Other teachers and mentors include Kai Eckhardt, Chuck Rainey and Michael Manring.

Connect with Ariane:

Blog | Website | OoN | Step Up Music Vallejo

Articles by Ariane Cap:

  • Talking Technique: Efficient Practice Hacks

    Talking Technique: Efficient Practice Hacks

    Are you (like me) always on the hunt for the latest and most efficient practice “hacks”? Today I am starting a series here on Talking Technique introducing you to my personal favorites. Some of them are quite unexpected, and I encourage you to try them and see the results for yourself. Some go back to... »

  • Talking Technique: Beautiful Practice in Minor

    Talking Technique: Beautiful Practice in Minor

    Last July, I published a Talking Technique lesson called “Beautiful Practice“. It recently made a reader’s favorite list for 2016 here on No Treble thanks to your likes, shares, and comments. Thank you for that! The lesson brought together music theory, comprehensive fretboard knowledge, and lots of technique aspects. I thought we’d bring the lesson... »

  • Talking Technique: The One-Finger-Per-Fret Controversy

    Talking Technique: The One-Finger-Per-Fret Controversy

    Some people are afraid for their fingers, while others swear by it: the one-finger-per-fret position. Is there is a reason to fret “one-finger-per-fret”? Not if done right. Is it worth getting it down? Yes! [Read to the end for “Practice-with-me” videos.] I definitely recommend having a solid grip (so to speak) on the one-finger-per-fret method.... »

  • Talking Technique: Pull Off Pentatonics

    Talking Technique: Pull Off Pentatonics

    Pentatonics using hammer-ons and pull-offs sounds great, but maybe you have noticed that if you stay within the same pentatonic pattern, you can only hammer on certain notes. In an effort to go beyond that, we are stringing two pentatonic patterns together so that we can pull off pull offs from every single note. I’ll... »

  • Talking Technique: The Power of Slow

    Talking Technique: The Power of Slow

    A little while ago, I finished the creation of a 20-week course which includes an extensive technique practice section. Students had requested videos similar to what you see in fitness videos – a way to just follow along with the video. And this became one consistent part of each week’s program: I recorded “Practice With... »

  • Talking Technique: Octaves on Overdrive

    Talking Technique: Octaves on Overdrive

    Today we’re going to go over a few tips on how to spice up a groove using octaves. Of course, we’ll focus on good fingering practices to make the notes sound smooth and connected. You can use this technique when practicing rudiments and scales, but check out this PDF to work up an example using... »

  • Talking Technique: Changing Technique Habits – What it Takes

    Talking Technique: Changing Technique Habits – What it Takes

    There is a step by step process that can help you change ingrained habits. It is a fast and effective technique to practice just about anything so effectively that it can become addictive. But it is also a great catalyst for changing ingrained habits. That is good news, because if you have ever tried to... »

  • Talking Technique: Drills for Fills – Applied

    Talking Technique: Drills for Fills – Applied

    In episode 22, we introduced a way of practicing scales that uses intervals rather than going up and down the scales themselves. We went over thirds, which gives you great materials for runs, fills, and solos. Someone asked in the comments if I could give some examples of how to use the material in a... »

  • Talking Technique: The Pistol Grip

    Talking Technique: The Pistol Grip

    If you’ve been following this column for a while, you know we place a lot of emphasis on the details of good technique, including the left hand. Sometimes, though, we go to see our favorite bass players and they have the “pistol grip”. So is it really necessary to use one finger per fret and... »

  • Talking Technique: Drills for Fills

    Talking Technique: Drills for Fills

    Everyone loves a perfectly placed fill. That’s why today we’ll be going over scalar exercises that will help us create those tasty licks while beefing up our technique. In essence, we’re practicing a scale. Typically when you play a scale, you go from root to root in order. But we’re going to break it down... »