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  • The “Bloody Thumb” Exercise for Thumb Position Playing

    The “Bloody Thumb” Exercise for Thumb Position Playing

    Thumb position is an essential technique for upright bass. Players like Steve Bailey and Brian Bromberg have even adapted it for use on the electric bass. However, when people first start using their left hand thumb to stop a note (i.e. play in thumb position) they often experience discomfort. This is sometimes due to their... »

  • Shifting Exercises for Bass

    Shifting Exercises for Bass

    Sometimes, just for fun, I like to work on the short shifting exercise below. It helps me measure my accuracy, ensure I am light during the shift, and that I am using minimum pressure with my fingers, all while keeping my shifting fluid. It’s short, fun and challenging. Keep the following things in mind: Play... »

  • Pyramiding: An Approach to Musical Exercise

    Pyramiding: An Approach to Musical Exercise

    There are many ways to approach a given exercise (e.g. trills, vibrato, etc.) and each have benefits. Some, of course, are more thorough than others. When I want to truly want to intensive on a particular area of technique I sometimes apply a concept borrowed from bodybuilding known as “pyramiding.” In simplest terms (when applying... »

  • Settling into a Groove: A Guide for Bass Players

    Settling into a Groove: A Guide for Bass Players

    One of the most important things we do as bass players is to create and lock into a groove. When I practice this I prefer a drum machine to a metronome. Here’s a guide to working with a drum machine to master the groove: 1. Set the tempo and style. Choose all the styles you... »

  • Finger Stamina Exercises for Bassists

    Finger Stamina Exercises for Bassists

    In our quest to develop left hand strength, flexibility, speed and stamina, we will discover and create many exercises and finger twisters. Sometimes, however, the simplest exercises are the best. Apply the two practice techniques below to your trills and reap the benefits. Trills for time Play a fast trill between two fingers (i.e. 1-2)... »

  • Understanding and Getting Around Roadblocks in Musical Development

    Understanding and Getting Around Roadblocks in Musical Development

    For this column, I wanted to answer a question I received on Facebook, as it is an important component in our musical development. Q: I’ve been working on these exercises for six months now and I haven’t made any progress on them. I am very frustrated and do not know how to move forward. Do... »

  • Structuring Your Practice: A Checklist for Bass Players

    Structuring Your Practice: A Checklist for Bass Players

    Any serious musician will practice regularly. While consistency is the most significant factor in our progress, we need to make good use of our practice time if we want continued improvement. No one set of specific materials (i.e. specific etudes, etc.) will be appropriate for everyone, but any successful long-term plan will hit on a... »

  • What’s In My Gig Bag? Part 2: Jazz/Rockabilly, Solo Shows and Flying

    What’s In My Gig Bag? Part 2: Jazz/Rockabilly, Solo Shows and Flying

    One of the things every gigging bassist needs to refine is what they bring to the gig, in addition to their bass and amp (if appropriate). We all have items we might need for gig emergencies and unforeseen circumstances. Showing up to the gig and having an equipment problem is no fun and ultimately it... »

  • What’s In My Gig Bag? Part 1: Classical

    What’s In My Gig Bag? Part 1: Classical

    One of the things every gigging bassist needs to refine is what they bring to the gig, in addition to their bass and amp (if appropriate). We all have items we might need for gig emergencies and unforeseen circumstances. Showing up to the gig and having an equipment problem is no fun and ultimately it... »

  • Focus on Breathing: An Essential Guide for Bass Players

    Focus on Breathing: An Essential Guide for Bass Players

    So many of us play with unneeded tension and spend a great deal of time trying to remedy this. We spend untold hours searching for the freedom of motion that will allow us to transcend our instrument. One aspect of tension that is sometimes overlooked is a player’s breathing. If you have never paid attention... »