Fender Introduces Classic Series Precision and Jazz Basses with Lacquer Finishes

Fender has expanded their bass lineup with the Classic Series ’60’s Jazz Bass Lacquer and Classic Series ’50s Precision Bass Lacquer. In following with the series, the basses pay homage to their vintage counterparts and distinguish themselves with period-correct gloss nitrocellulose lacquer finishes.

Fender Classic Series ’60’s Jazz Bass

The Classic Series ’60’s Jazz Bass Lacquer is built with an alder body, an ultra-slim “C”-shaped maple neck, and a rosewood fingerboard sporting 20 vintage-style frets. Other features include a pair of vintage-style alnico pickups, a four-ply brown shell pickguard, and vintage-style reverse tuners.

Fender Classic Series ’50s Precision Bass

The Classic Series ’50s Precision Bass Lacquer also has an alder body and maple neck. Available in black, the P-bass is fitted with a gold anodized pickguard and a vintage-style single-coil pickup.

The Fender Classic Series ’60’s Jazz Bass Lacquer and Classic Series ’50s Precision Bass Lacquer ship with Tweed cases. They are available now with street prices of $899. For more info, check out the Fender website.

Fender Classic Series ’60’s Jazz Bass Specs:

  • Color: 3-Color Sunburst
  • Body Material: Alder
  • Body Finish: Gloss Nitrocellulose Lacquer
  • Neck Material: Maple
  • Neck Finish: Gloss Nitrocellulose Lacquer
  • Neck Shape: “C” Shape
  • Scale Length: 34? (864 mm)
  • Fingerboard Material: Rosewood
  • Fingerboard Radius: 7.25? (184.1 mm)
  • Number of Frets: 20
  • Fret Size: Vintage-Style
  • Nut Material: Synthetic Bone
  • Nut Width: 1.5? (38.1 mm)
  • Position Inlays: White Dot
  • Truss Rod Nut: Vintage-Style Slotted
  • Pickups: Standard Vintage Alnico Magnet Single-Coil Jazz Bass
  • Pickup Configuration: S/S
  • Controls: Volume 1. (Middle Pickup), Volume 2. (Bridge Pickup), Master Tone
  • Hardware Finish: Nickel/Chrome
  • Bridge: 4-Saddle American Vintage Bass
  • Tuning Machines: Vintage Style Reverse
  • Pickguard: 4-Ply Brown Shell
  • Control Knobs: Black Plastic
  • Strap Buttons: Vintage-Style
  • Neck Plate: 4-Bolt Vintage Style
  • Accessories Case/Gig Bag: Tweed Case

Fender Classic Series ’50s Precision Bass Specs:

  • Color: Black
  • Body Material: Alder
  • Body Finish: Gloss Nitrocellulose Lacquer
  • Neck Material: Maple
  • Neck Finish: Gloss Nitrocellulose Lacquer
  • Neck Shape: “C” Shape
  • Scale Length: 34? (864 mm)
  • Fingerboard Material: Maple
  • Fingerboard Radius: 7.25? (184.1 mm)
  • Number of Frets: 20
  • Fret Size: Vintage-Style
  • Nut Material: Synthetic Bone
  • Nut Width: 1.75? (44.45 mm)
  • Position Inlays: Black Dot
  • Truss Rod Nut: Vintage-Style Slotted
  • Pickups: Vintage Split Single-Coil Precision Bass
  • Controls: Master Volume, Master Tone
  • Hardware Finish: Nickel/Chrome
  • Bridge: 4-Saddle American Vintage Bass
  • Tuning Machines: Vintage Style Reverse
  • Pickguard: Gold Anodized Aluminum
  • Control Knobs: Knurled Chrome
  • Strap Buttons: Vintage-Style
  • Neck Plate: 4-Bolt Vintage Style
  • Accessories Case/Gig Bag: Tweed Case

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Share your thoughts

  1. Wait… is this the same kind of finish that always gets worn and chipped and rubbed away? If so, I think I have to get one of these.

  2. On the Jazz, did they surface rout or tunnel for the neck PU wires? I like to play without a pick guard.

  3. The Fender P still the heavyweight champ! Glad to see reasonable street prices. Fender’s Classic Series IMO is far superior to the American Standard.

  4. Are these made in Mexico? Or where?

    • either mexico or not mexico.

    • You’re the worst.

    • Hecho en Mexico, by real Mexicans. Or spend $500 more for one built in California, by Mexicans.

    • that is funny, lol

    • It’s not the Mexicans that are the problem. But the MIM guitars have shortcuts in their design. (For example two of the same sized pickup in the Jazz Bass instead of the bottom one slightly wider than the top one, as in the originals, American Standard, and American Vintage series.) So even if you tried to upgrade the pickups, they wouldn’t fit without some body/pickguard modification to go with it. That’s just one example.

      These do look nice for the price though. Fender seems to have some new fast drying solvent that’s letting them bring down the prices of nitro finished guitars. (Which done in the classic way takes multiple coats and days to dry.) Probably the same process as what they’re calling “Flash Coat Lacquer” in the newly revamped American Vintage series.

      • beefybeefy

        This model, the Classic Series Jazz Bass, has a wider bridge pickup than the neck pickup like the American spec. I think there was only a specific date range when Fender ‘Standard’ series Jazz basses had the design shortcut.

  5. Fender is définitely taking us for idiots: those are exactly the same basses as 15 years ago, at the same price, but built in Mexico….. oh ok it’s a nitro finish, does that always mean it must cost much? seriously….

    Fender is just following his old politic: exploited workers… for the same price!

  6. I wonder if this is the same “nitro” finish they advertised on their American Deluxe models back in the late 90’s. They shot laquer color and then cleared them in poly. Kinda defeats the purpose. Not to mention, that’s way too much money for a Mexican made guitar.

  7. I am a self confessed hardcore Fender fan. Anyone who steps in my studio knows that. I will definetly hook up with both the Jazz/Precision. I however am going to also use this coment space to shine a very favorable light on Squier. I recently purchased the Squier Vintage Modified Fretless Jazz with the sunburst finish and Ebanol fretboard. It came with roundwounds on it, but those were off quick and the instrument was setup and restrung with Rotosound Flatwound Jazz Strings. People, do not sell Squier short anymore. My example is beautifully made and tight. I may one day switch out the pickups to the Fender Jazz 60s but maybe not. The Ebanol fretboard is slick and guess what, it is a Fender. My point is I’ve always been a Certified Fender Brand Snot and this single item I purchased made a believer out of me.

  8. James Peterson · Top Commenter · Founder and Director at Unchained Grace Ministries, LLC.

    I am a self confessed hardcore Fender fan. Anyone who steps in my studio knows that. I will definetly hook up with both the Jazz/Precision. I however am going to also use this coment space to shine a very favorable light on Squier. I recently purchased the Squier Vintage Modified Fretless Jazz with the sunburst finish and Ebanol fretboard. It came with roundwounds on it, but those were off quick and the instrument was setup and restrung with Rotosound Flatwound Jazz Strings. People, do not sell Squier short anymore. My example is beautifully made and tight. I may one day switch out the pickups to the Fender Jazz 60s but maybe not. The Ebanol fretboard is slick and guess what, it is a Fender. My point is I’ve always been a Certified Fender Brand Snob and this single item I purchased made a believer out of me.

    • Agreed. I bought mine used with a Leo Quan Badass II bridge on it though… it’ll be in my stable forever.

      That’s quite a statement to make – my friends know I’m a complete flake about gear. :)

  9. OK. I went off the chain with my last comment but that happens when I seee something like this. I read and reread the specs on the above and Fender is really going to do it right here! I’m in for one of both. $899 don’t sound too dangerous but that’s MSRP, right?

  10. I still don’t get why you would want a vintage instrument that isn’t vintage…i much prefer the MIM jazz bass I have modded to modern specs…it looks and sounds like any vintage jazz bass but plays much better and stays in tune much better than those with the stupid reverse tuners and cheap ass stamped bridge.

  11. Yogen

    I’m think of buying the 50’s P bass, asked around on talkbass and got positive responses, but here is all negative.
    Is it a good buy or can I get something better for less? (A Fender P bass)

    • beefybeefy

      Both of these basses are awesome. If you want an affordable vintage reissue then consider getting one of these.
      The tuners hold tune, the bridge intonates and holds the strings just fine. The necks are stable and don’t have graphite reinforcement rods, and neither did real vintage basses.
      The vintage sized frets sound and feel great.

      Don’t let the simplicity of the design fool you. Sometimes less is more.

      If you want a modern bass with a high mass hipshot bridge and ultra light tuners, and maybe a preamp, then no you don’t want this b/c that’s not what it is.