the online magazine for bass players

Search Menu

Fender Introduces Classic Series Precision and Jazz Basses with Lacquer Finishes

Fender has expanded their bass lineup with the Classic Series ’60’s Jazz Bass Lacquer and Classic Series ’50s Precision Bass Lacquer. In following with the series, the basses pay homage to their vintage counterparts and distinguish themselves with period-correct gloss nitrocellulose lacquer finishes.

Fender Classic Series ’60’s Jazz Bass

The Classic Series ’60’s Jazz Bass Lacquer is built with an alder body, an ultra-slim “C”-shaped maple neck, and a rosewood fingerboard sporting 20 vintage-style frets. Other features include a pair of vintage-style alnico pickups, a four-ply brown shell pickguard, and vintage-style reverse tuners.

Fender Classic Series ’50s Precision Bass

The Classic Series ’50s Precision Bass Lacquer also has an alder body and maple neck. Available in black, the P-bass is fitted with a gold anodized pickguard and a vintage-style single-coil pickup.

The Fender Classic Series ’60’s Jazz Bass Lacquer and Classic Series ’50s Precision Bass Lacquer ship with Tweed cases. They are available now with street prices of $899. For more info, check out the Fender website.

Fender Classic Series ’60’s Jazz Bass Specs:

  • Color: 3-Color Sunburst
  • Body Material: Alder
  • Body Finish: Gloss Nitrocellulose Lacquer
  • Neck Material: Maple
  • Neck Finish: Gloss Nitrocellulose Lacquer
  • Neck Shape: “C” Shape
  • Scale Length: 34˝ (864 mm)
  • Fingerboard Material: Rosewood
  • Fingerboard Radius: 7.25˝ (184.1 mm)
  • Number of Frets: 20
  • Fret Size: Vintage-Style
  • Nut Material: Synthetic Bone
  • Nut Width: 1.5˝ (38.1 mm)
  • Position Inlays: White Dot
  • Truss Rod Nut: Vintage-Style Slotted
  • Pickups: Standard Vintage Alnico Magnet Single-Coil Jazz Bass
  • Pickup Configuration: S/S
  • Controls: Volume 1. (Middle Pickup), Volume 2. (Bridge Pickup), Master Tone
  • Hardware Finish: Nickel/Chrome
  • Bridge: 4-Saddle American Vintage Bass
  • Tuning Machines: Vintage Style Reverse
  • Pickguard: 4-Ply Brown Shell
  • Control Knobs: Black Plastic
  • Strap Buttons: Vintage-Style
  • Neck Plate: 4-Bolt Vintage Style
  • Accessories Case/Gig Bag: Tweed Case

Fender Classic Series ’50s Precision Bass Specs:

  • Color: Black
  • Body Material: Alder
  • Body Finish: Gloss Nitrocellulose Lacquer
  • Neck Material: Maple
  • Neck Finish: Gloss Nitrocellulose Lacquer
  • Neck Shape: “C” Shape
  • Scale Length: 34˝ (864 mm)
  • Fingerboard Material: Maple
  • Fingerboard Radius: 7.25˝ (184.1 mm)
  • Number of Frets: 20
  • Fret Size: Vintage-Style
  • Nut Material: Synthetic Bone
  • Nut Width: 1.75˝ (44.45 mm)
  • Position Inlays: Black Dot
  • Truss Rod Nut: Vintage-Style Slotted
  • Pickups: Vintage Split Single-Coil Precision Bass
  • Controls: Master Volume, Master Tone
  • Hardware Finish: Nickel/Chrome
  • Bridge: 4-Saddle American Vintage Bass
  • Tuning Machines: Vintage Style Reverse
  • Pickguard: Gold Anodized Aluminum
  • Control Knobs: Knurled Chrome
  • Strap Buttons: Vintage-Style
  • Neck Plate: 4-Bolt Vintage Style
  • Accessories Case/Gig Bag: Tweed Case

Related topics: , , , ,

Win an Ampeg Portaflex Bass Rig and SCR-DI Bass DI Pedal

Enter for your chance to win one of these awesome prizes from Ampeg!

Enter Now

Share your thoughts

      beefybeefy

      beefybeefy

      This model, the Classic Series Jazz Bass, has a wider bridge pickup than the neck pickup like the American spec. I think there was only a specific date range when Fender ‘Standard’ series Jazz basses had the design shortcut.

Yogen

Yogen

I’m think of buying the 50’s P bass, asked around on talkbass and got positive responses, but here is all negative.
Is it a good buy or can I get something better for less? (A Fender P bass)

    beefybeefy

    beefybeefy

    Both of these basses are awesome. If you want an affordable vintage reissue then consider getting one of these.
    The tuners hold tune, the bridge intonates and holds the strings just fine. The necks are stable and don’t have graphite reinforcement rods, and neither did real vintage basses.
    The vintage sized frets sound and feel great.

    Don’t let the simplicity of the design fool you. Sometimes less is more.

    If you want a modern bass with a high mass hipshot bridge and ultra light tuners, and maybe a preamp, then no you don’t want this b/c that’s not what it is.