Ask Damian Erskine: Call for Questions

Damian Erskine

For nearly 10 years, I’ve been writing a weekly Q&A column here on No Treble. It has been an exciting journey, and every once in a while, the well runs dry.

So, here’s a “Call for Questions” post!

If you have any questions regarding theory, practicing, gigging, or anything else bass-related, I’d love to hear it. (That could also include asking questions you think might be helpful to your fellow readers, even if it isn’t for you.)

Thanks for reading and thanks for your questions.

Here are two ways to send me questions:

Email me at askdamian@notreble.com or post them in the comments below.

Have a question for Damian Erskine? Send it to askdamian@notreble.com. Check out Damian’s instructional books, Right Hand Drive and The Improviser’s Path.

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Share your thoughts

  1. John Rider

    Why are other instruments like piano, violin, guitar seen as more acceptable to play solo without accompaniment but bass is still up against it so to speak ? I like playing solo arrangements on my six string bass (E to F) and have had good reception playing some local coffee houses but it still feels like theres a barrier! Even some bass friends I know are like where’s the groove!!

  2. How do you switch between 4/5/6 strings when the low E has been ingrained in my memory? I’ve been trying for many years and still get notes mixed up when I change basses.

  3. Michael Rinus

    How can you actually develop and train to play in a certain microtime feel regarding playing laid back, on the time, ahead the time and even worse, that cool sluggish neo soul stumbling kinda feel?

  4. Sandy W

    Hi Damian, I’m sure you’ve addressed this issue before but…I literally have 100 things to practice. Exercises, tunes, scales, modes, arpeggios, riffs, heads, song changes, transcribing, ear training, basic piano skills, videos, play a-longs, music reading, reading columns, learning tunes for a band. The list just goes on and on as you can multiply nearly every item by 10. I can’t possibly get to everything every day but if I let some some stuff slide one day I may not not get back to it for weeks or months. Enough time that I’ve practically forgotten what I thought I had learned. I devote about 4 hours a day to this stuff but still feel overwhelmed. You play gigs, you write, you teach, you practice, and I assume you have a family or social life too. How do you manage to, not only stay on top of things but, also to progress and have some fun? I remember when playing was fun but my skills were limited. Ignorance was bliss. Now, the more I learn the more I see how much more there is to learn.
    Thanks