Ibanez Adds Short Scale Models to EHB Headless Bass Lineup

Ibanez EHB1005SMS Series Headless Bass

Last year, Ibanez turned heads with their new EHB headless design. Now they’ve taken the same idea and put it into a more compact size. The EHB1000S and the EHB1005SMS have all the same features as the EHB1000 but with shorter scales. The EHB1000S has a 30-inch scale while the five-string EHB1005SMS employs a multi-scale design that goes from 30 inches on the G string to 32 inches on the B string.

“These basses also feature contoured, ergonomic designs and chambered bodies that make for a lightweight, well-balanced, and comfortable playing experience; excellent for long sets or practice sessions,” Ibanez states. “There is an extended relief cut on the back of the body behind the lower horn for easier upper fret access. Also, the top half of the back of the body is slanted which allows the bass to rest slightly closer to the player’s body for better control and a more ergonomic feel.”

Similar to their predecessor, the new basses are fitted with a pair of Bartolini BH2 pickups and an active/passive Vari-mid 3-band EQ. Ibanez offers the EHB1000S in Sea Foam Green and Pink Gold Metallic Matte finishes. The Multi-scale version comes in Emerald Green Metallic and Metallic Gray Matte.

See the EHB1000S-PMM in action:

The Ibanez EHB1000S and EHB1000MS will be available soon with street prices of $999.99 and $1,149.

Ibanez EHB1000S Series Headless Bass Specs:

Strings:4
Scale:30″
Body:Basswood
Neck:5-piece Roasted Maple/Walnut with Graphite Reinforcement
Fretboard:Roasted Birdseye Maple
Frets:24
Inlays:Abalone Off-Set Dots
Pickups:Bartolini BH2
Electronics:Vari-mid 3-band EQ w/ EQ bypass switch (passive tone control on treble pot)
Bridge:MR5HS
String Spacing:18mm
Hardware:Black
Finish:Sea Foam Green Matte, Pink Gold Metallic Matte

Ibanez EHB1005SMS Series Headless Bass Specs:

Strings:5
Scale:30″-32″
Body:Basswood
Neck:5-piece Roasted Maple/Walnut with Graphite Reinforcement
Fretboard:Roasted Birdseye Maple
Frets:24
Inlays:Abalone Off-Set Dots
Pickups:Bartolini BH2
Electronics:Vari-mid 3-band EQ w/ EQ bypass switch (passive tone control on treble pot)
Bridge:MR5HS
String Spacing:18mm
Hardware:Black
Finish:Emerald Green Metallic Matte, Metallic Gray Matte

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Share your thoughts

  1. I’m sick and tired of these bass video promos and reviews with all of that slapping and plucking. IMO that’s not bassplaying, that’s a circus-act. Cut the slapping crap please! Listen to Lee Sklar: “when I’m in my local bassguitarshop and some kid wants to show off with this slapping, I say goodbye and walk out”. Like in this Ibanez film: I cannot decide if this could be a bass for me, because all I heard was this terrible slapping and hammering. So no Ibanez for me…..

  2. Piotr

    I’m not a big fan of slapping anymore but I think this kind of playing works great in this demo.

    • I think Ibanez made a big mistake with this slap/hammer act. It restricts the benefits of this bass. They will lose the attention of a large part of bassplayers. They will stick to their Precision, JB, Musicman, Gibson etc type of guitar. As a lifelong Fender player I am very happy with my Nordstrand Acinonyx. It got my attention because of a promo where a “normal” bassist played the instrument. The lady in the Ibanez promo is not a musician, she’s showing tricks on a bass.

      • Piotr

        Your comment proves Ibanez did they marketing right, because they probably assumed a pink, headless, short scale/multiscale instrument with active electronics won’t appeal to “normal bassist”.

        • Martin

          I disagree. Surely, the aim of advertising a bass is to reach as many people as you can. The rock world and many popular bands these days still do not employ slap. In all of thirty years of playing I have only played one song in the bands I was in that used slap effectively. TBH, I get bored with bass players who use tricks rather than the emotional content that a true bass player employs, he may use slap or he may not, it is simply one technique in an arsenal of bass playing techniques. So I say, by all means illustrate what the bass can do, but interleave it with the more popular techniques as evidenced by the more popular songs.

          • I wanted to leave the discussion, but Martin gave me a little boost. I admit, I hate slapping; I consider it a circus-act, showing off. To me it has nothing to do with being a musician. It’ a technical trick. I rest with this: Ibanez made a pink,headless, funny toy bassguitar. It’s ideal for Youtube films in which young bassists can show their non-musical skills. I know young very talented bassplayers; they don’t slap/hammer but learn to listen to other instruments in a musicpiece and find a perfect basspart in that arrangement.